Here's our Prime problem Equipment, This is some exerpts from a report Morgan Stanley did on the Shale Oil and Gas situstion also a quick calculation of the Formation Pressure as stated in PFC Presentation of Nov 2011 of 2300 Psi, This shows the mid Arthur ck has a lot of Gas crammed in there we just have to un-lock it.


MORGAN STANLEY AUSTRALIAN SHALE GAS REPORT JUNE 2011
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A good frac needs shear horse power, and some single
frac jobs in the US require 40 trucks hooked up delivering
50,000 hp.  About 85% of all fracturing ‘spreads’ are in the US.
(A spread is the equivalent of four frac units of a certain size,
plus blending and ancillary equipment). In North America
there are about 870 spreads (i.e. about 3500 trucks).  In
Australia the number of ‘spreads’ is five, and operators which
are active at the moment are having to share the limited
number of trucks, as well as the costs of moving these trucks
all over the country, from the Cooper Basin, to the Perth Basin,
to the Georgina Basin, etc.
 
More high-specification drilling rigs will be needed. In the
US there are over 950 land rigs operating. In Australia there
are a handful spread across the country and they are not
easily mobilized between regions. In WA, there is one rig
being shared among operators.  Into the future, the rig specs
will go up too as some regions that target shales are +/-4000m,
and then future development is likely to dictate extended
horizontal sections.

Pressure gradient. Some shale rocks are over-pressured,
and this is the concentration of gas within a fixed volume of
rock. The normal hydrostatic pressure gradient is 0.43 psi per
foot of depth. In the US, over-pressure is common to
successful fields, with the Barnett shale gradient at 0.55 psi/ft
and the Haynesville shale at 0.85 psi/ft.
**PFC PRESENTATION NOV 2011 MID ARTHUR CK AT 2300 PSI DEPTH 2939ft (896m)
 Pressure Gradient = 0.782