Lung cancer is BIG and UGLY worldwide,

MBI will be BIG and BEAUTIFUL soon (hopefully) worldwide

 

 

GLOBOCAN 2008
CANCER FACT SHEET
  
    Incidence: men
    Mortality: men
    Incidence: women
    Mortality: women

Lung Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide in 2008
Summary

 

 

Estimated numbers (thousands) Men Women Both sexes
Cases Deaths Cases Deaths Cases Deaths
 World 1092 948 515 427 1607 1375
 More developed regions 479 410 243 188 722 598
 Less developed regions 612 538 272 239 884 777
 WHO Africa region (AFRO) 12 11 4 4 16 15
 WHO Americas region (PAHO) 172 144 134 101 306 245
 WHO East Mediterranean region (EMRO) 21 19 5 4 26 23
 WHO Europe region (EURO) 310 276 107 91 417 367
 WHO South-East Asia region (SEARO) 108 97 42 37 150 134
 WHO Western Pacific region (WPRO) 465 397 222 187 687 584
 IARC membership (22 countries) 469 399 237 182 706 581
 United States of America 114 90 100 71 214 161
 China 351 304 170 148 521 452
 India 47 41 11 10 58 51
 European Union (EU-27) 206 182 82 71 288 253
Estimated age-standardised rates (World) per 100,000

At a glance

 

Lung cancer has been the most common cancer in the world for several decades, and by 2008, there were an estimated 1.61 million new cases, representing 12.7% of all new cancers. It was also the most common cause of death from cancer, with 1.38 million deaths (18.2% of the total).
The majority of the cases now occur in the developing countries (55%). Lung cancer is still the most common cancer in men worldwide (1.1 million cases, 16.5% of the total), with high rates in Central-Eastern and Southern Europe, Northern America and Eastern Asia. Very low rates are still estimated in Middle and Western Africa (ASRs 2.8 and 3.1 per 100,000 respectively). In females, incidence rates are generally lower, but, worldwide, lung cancer is now the fourth most frequent cancer of women (516 000 cases, 8.5% of all cancers) and the second most common cause of death from cancer (427 000 deaths, 12.8% of the total). The highest incidence rate is observed in Northern America (where lung cancer it is now the second most frequent cancer in women), and the lowest in Middle Africa (15th most frequent cancer).
Because of its high fatality (the ratio of mortality to incidence is 0.86) and the lack of variability in survival in developed and developing countries, the highest and lowest mortality rates are estimated in the same regions, both in men and women.