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Cliff Natural Resources Inc CLF

Sector: Metals & Mining | Sub-Sector: Industrial Metals & Minerals


Cliff Natural Resources Inc > RE: ask management

February 23, 2013 - 08:48 PM 338 Reads
Post# 21034066
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RE: ask management

if i was a smart ceo of a company and a partner offered me something on the silver plater then i would take full advantage because there is always problems that one can not solve on their own ??? but there is the alternative but management refuses to work with for the better or profitability of all ??? think it time there is a change at the top asap ... so if wages are a problem with keeping cost under control and your management is focused on a truck route for your chromite ore then what happens when the shortage hits and this mono focused company has a problem hiring drivers to ship ore ??? will they tell shareholders sorry today we can not ship the required quota because we do not have the required driving force to ship ???

Trucker shortage looms for Alberta

Province expected to need 6,200 drivers by 2020

Posted: Feb 21, 2013 4:28 PM MT

Last Updated: Feb 21, 2013 6:07 PM MT

 

The Conference Board of Canada study predicts that by 2020 the province will need an extra 6,200 truck drivers to keep the economy rolling.

The shortage will be about 25,000 countrywide, according to the report which was funded by the Canadian Trucking Alliance.

An aging workforce is a big part of the problem, said Emmet Callaghan who owns a truck driver training school in Calgary.

"The age of current truck drivers is getting old, like the baby boomers are moving through the system and there will be a shortage and the industry is growing as well, so it's kind of a double hit,” he said.

The Conference Board report says a few things should be done to help make the job more attractive, such as higher wages, better working conditions and upgraded licence standards.

Twenty-year veteran driver Peter Goodfellow agrees.

"A Class1 licence is a professional licence, but it's not recognized as a certified trade so the wages are low and the wages do not compensate for the time away from your family,” he said.

According to the Canadian Trucking Alliance, trucks haul about 90 per cent of the goods we buy and sell as well as most of the items traded with the U.S.

In a bid to address the looming shortage of drivers the province is looking at providing loans or grants to people considering becoming truckers. The training course costs about $7,500.

"I drive down the road and every second truck that passes me I see advertises for drivers, we need drivers," said Goodfellow.