Liquidity is in the Eye of the Holder

Peter Schiff
Oct 4, 2008

We are being told loudly and repeatedly that the gargantuan mortgage bail-out package is necessary because illiquid mortgage-backed securities are clogging our financial arteries, threatening the economic equivalent of cardiac arrest. The idea of the plan is to transfer these supposedly valuable, but currently unmarketable, assets to the government so that private institutions can freely lend once more. The monumental flaw in this argument is that the mortgage backed securities are in fact highly liquid, just not at the prices the owners would like to receive.

Mortgage bonds are just like houses. They won't sell if the owners stubbornly refuse to drop the price. However, they can find buyers if they acknowledge reality, and lower their expectations accordingly.

The government tells us that if these assets are held to maturity their full value will eventually be realized, and that it is only because of a lack of current liquidity that their value is not reflected in the market. However, as many private transactions have shown us in recent months, these assets will find buyers at the right price. These are not overly exotic assets but relatively straight forward mortgage obligations. The inability to find buyers is not a function of liquidity but simply of price. The government is seeking to "create liquidity" by overpaying.

Full article:

http://www.321gold.com/editorials/schiff/schiff100408.html

PS.  This financial crisis, housing crisis, etc., maybe nothing works in the markets.

PSS.  May have to go to dividend stocks, at least you get paid to wait and maybe in the future you can get some capital appreciation too.

Cheers,
Dave.