Check out PEV-TSXV as they should be a big hit in 2012 with their recently announced JV into the Chinese homeland market for their rechargeable battery technologies. Further, their master distributor to the retail market, IGO, is ramping up sales. See below.
Lastly, their wire free technology division (WildCharge) is pending an announcement on potential sale.
This is going to be interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aci2ygQiF-s

New Products: Alkaline Rechargeable Batteries

In addition to the iGo Green chip, which is due in the first quarter of 2012, iGo has also developed a slate of rechargeable alkaline batteries.

“Most rechargeable batteries on the market are nickel metal hydride,” said Rossi. “We're the only ones with a rechargeable alkaline battery. The difference is, one, our alkaline batteries don't have any toxicity in them. Nickel rechargeable batteries have a toxic metal in them. And ours are much lower cost.”

Rossi said that you can buy a four-pack of iGo's rechargeable alkaline batteries for about $8, while the average price of a four-pack of regular (disposable) alkaline batteries is about $4.99, “depending on where you get them.”

“After about two charging cycles [with iGo batteries], you've already made your money back,” he said. “You can get up to as many as 20 recharges off of our batteries, so over the life of them you can save around $90 by using rechargeable batteries.”

That, of course, assumes you can actually find the batteries in store. “There's quite a bit of obstacles to building that business because there's essentially a duopoly in the disposable battery market between Duracell and Energizer (NYSE: ENR),” said Rossi. “They would prefer that consumers don't use rechargeable batteries because it cuts into their businesses, and they have relationships with retailers and apply pressure to them to not carry rechargeable batteries.

“We think we have a good product and we're steadily building out the distribution for it, but there are certainly some impediments to getting broad distribution, but we're slowly grinding away at it.”

ACTION ITEMS:



Read more: http://www.benzinga.com/trading-ideas/long-ideas/11/12/2193575/will-igo-power-your-portfolio#ixzz1i2S8arkd

Check out PEV-TSXV as they should be a big hit in 2012 with their recently announced JV into the Chinese homeland market for their rechargeable battery technologies. Further, their master distributor to the retail market, IGO, is ramping up sales. See below.
Lastly, their wire free technology division (WildCharge) is pending an announcement on potential sale.
This is going to be interesting.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aci2ygQiF-s
New Products: Alkaline Rechargeable Batteries
In addition to the iGo Green chip, which is due in the first quarter of 2012, iGo has also developed a slate of rechargeable alkaline batteries.
“Most rechargeable batteries on the market are nickel metal hydride,” said Rossi. “We're the only ones with a rechargeable alkaline battery. The difference is, one, our alkaline batteries don't have any toxicity in them. Nickel rechargeable batteries have a toxic metal in them. And ours are much lower cost.”
Rossi said that you can buy a four-pack of iGo's rechargeable alkaline batteries for about $8, while the average price of a four-pack of regular (disposable) alkaline batteries is about $4.99, “depending on where you get them.”
“After about two charging cycles [with iGo batteries], you've already made your money back,” he said. “You can get up to as many as 20 recharges off of our batteries, so over the life of them you can save around $90 by using rechargeable batteries.”
That, of course, assumes you can actually find the batteries in store. “There's quite a bit of obstacles to building that business because there's essentially a duopoly in the disposable battery market between Duracell and Energizer (NYSE: ENR),” said Rossi. “They would prefer that consumers don't use rechargeable batteries because it cuts into their businesses, and they have relationships with retailers and apply pressure to them to not carry rechargeable batteries.
“We think we have a good product and we're steadily building out the distribution for it, but there are certainly some impediments to getting broad distribution, but we're slowly grinding away at it.”
ACTION ITEMS:


Read more: http://www.benzinga.com/trading-ideas/long-ideas/11/12/2193575/will-igo-power-your-portfolio#ixzz1i2S8arkd

Check out PEV-TSXV as they should be a big hit in 2012 with their recently announced JV into the Chinese homeland market for their rechargeable battery technologies. Further, their master distributor to the retail market, IGO, is ramping up sales. See below.
Lastly, their wire free technology division (WildCharge) is pending an announcement on potential sale.
This is going to be interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aci2ygQiF-s

New Products: Alkaline Rechargeable Batteries

In addition to the iGo Green chip, which is due in the first quarter of 2012, iGo has also developed a slate of rechargeable alkaline batteries.

“Most rechargeable batteries on the market are nickel metal hydride,” said Rossi. “We're the only ones with a rechargeable alkaline battery. The difference is, one, our alkaline batteries don't have any toxicity in them. Nickel rechargeable batteries have a toxic metal in them. And ours are much lower cost.”

Rossi said that you can buy a four-pack of iGo's rechargeable alkaline batteries for about $8, while the average price of a four-pack of regular (disposable) alkaline batteries is about $4.99, “depending on where you get them.”

“After about two charging cycles [with iGo batteries], you've already made your money back,” he said. “You can get up to as many as 20 recharges off of our batteries, so over the life of them you can save around $90 by using rechargeable batteries.”

That, of course, assumes you can actually find the batteries in store. “There's quite a bit of obstacles to building that business because there's essentially a duopoly in the disposable battery market between Duracell and Energizer (NYSE: ENR),” said Rossi. “They would prefer that consumers don't use rechargeable batteries because it cuts into their businesses, and they have relationships with retailers and apply pressure to them to not carry rechargeable batteries.

“We think we have a good product and we're steadily building out the distribution for it, but there are certainly some impediments to getting broad distribution, but we're slowly grinding away at it.”

ACTION ITEMS:



Read more: http://www.benzinga.com/trading-ideas/long-ideas/11/12/2193575/will-igo-power-your-portfolio#ixzz1i2S8arkd

 

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