We are starting to see price divergence in silver between the COMEX in New York and the new Hong Kong Metal Exchange. There was some excitement when the HKMEx was announced. Many felt that the new exchange would allow for much more accurate price discovery than we have been used to on the COMEX or the London Metal Exchange. Both of the latter exchanges have been the subject of rumours regarding manipulation of prices, concerns that they daily trade many times more gold or silver than they can possibly have in physical storage, and undue influence by governments and under-regulated banksters for their own purposes and benefit. Silver has certainly shown signs of price suppression over the last 50 years or so, failing to react to market and economic forces that should have caused price movement one way or the other over the years.      So far, the HKME has followed the LME and COMEX prices fairly closely, occasionally getting ahead of those markets but pulling back after COMEX open. Today, we see sliver trading at $41.90 to $42 USD on the HKME, while COMEX is trading at $39.70. Bear in mind that the West views silver more as a commodity, while Asia views silver as a basic currency. This may well explain some of the price difference, as Asians use the lower priced silver as an affordable "safe haven" in the face of local and global economic turmoil. The western world's abandonment of gold and silver as fundamental currency in favour of the "fiat" currency experiment, is the root cause of this difference in attitude. Is today's price divergence a further sign of the collapse of the "Fiat Economy" in the West? Will physical silver and gold, globally recognised as having intrinsic value, prove to be a more stable currency base than paper promises printed by banksters at the behest of governments? Stay tuned........